Browse Active Research Projects

Undergraduates can participate in projects for credits by registering in CS 4974 or 4994. Consult the Faculty Advisor or Research Supervisor before you register for this course.

Participation on a VTURCS project could also lead to an honors thesis for CS majors interested in graduating with honors.

Can't find anything that piques your curiousity? Don't be afraid to check out the Computer Science faculty list for someone who has a research interest you'd like to know more about. They might just have something for you.

Nicholas F. Polys

3D Blacksburg

Faculty Advisor
Nicholas F. Polys
Research Supervisor
Nicholas F. Polys
Description of Work
Th collection, translation and integration of geospatial information is increasingly important for safety, development, transportation and policy. This independent study will work on any of several aspects for 3DBlacksburg.org from the server to the client.
Application Instructions
Email to setup a convenient time to discuss details.
Project URL
not online yet
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Databases
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
npolys@vt.edu
Doug Bowman

3D user interfaces for gaming

Faculty Advisor
Doug Bowman
Research Supervisor
Doug Bowman
Description of Work
Recent game consoles (e.g., Sony PS3 and Microsoft XBox 360) have sophisticated 3D spatial input capabilities (Sony Move and Microsoft Kinect). In this project, students will use these platforms to develop and evaluate 3D interaction techniques for navigation, selection, and manipulation in gaming contexts.
Application Instructions
Send a resume to bowman@vt.edu and explain your relevant background and interests in this project. Experience with GUI programming (CS 3744), HCI (CS 3724), and 3D graphics (CS 4204) is highly desirable, but not required.
Project URL
http://research.cs.vt.edu/3di/
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
bowman@vt.edu
Nicholas Polys

3D User Interfaces for Scientific Visualization

Faculty Advisor
Nicholas Polys
Research Supervisor
Nicholas Polys
Description of Work
In the Visionarium Lab [https://snoid.sv.vt.edu/visionarium/] , we are using tablets and multi-touch tables to add 2D interfaces to immersive virtual environments. This project will explore alternative architectures and techniques to support scientific analysis.
Application Instructions
Email me.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction, Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
npolys@vt.eud
Stephen Edwards

Adding Built-in Self-testing to JavaBeans Components

Faculty Advisor
Stephen Edwards
Research Supervisor
Stephen Edwards
Description of Work
Our research group has been developing approaches for embedding a component's test suite(s) in a "self-testing" wrapper together with the necessary scaffolding needed to run the suite(s). By packaging a wrapper class together with the original, and providing a way for either one to be created on demand, a clean, transparent self-testing capability can be provided. The goal of this project is to adapt these techniques to JavaBeans, where the extra features would be packaged together with the original bean inside its jar.
Application Instructions
Stop by during my office hours to discuss possibilities.
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
edwards@cs.vt.edu
Alexey Onufriev and Adrian Sandu

Algorithm Development for Molecular Dynamics

Faculty Advisor
Alexey Onufriev and Adrian Sandu
Research Supervisor
Alexey Onufriev and Adrian Sandu
Description of Work
To participate in development and testing of new algorithms that speed up molecular dynamics simulations. Here is the problem: a typical macromeolecule is made up of at least ~10,000 atoms, and so to describe its motion, 60,000 or more differential equations must be solved simultaneosly. One way to speed up the calculations is by using the so-called "multiple time-step" methods, in which the integration time-step is effectively increased with minimal impact on the accuracy of the solution. At this stage, we will be testing out different ideas to access their viability for further development. You will get hands-on experience with the software and methodology currently in high demand due to explosive development in the bio- and nano-technology areas.
Application Instructions
Please e-mail us.
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Theory, Bioinformatics
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
onufriev@cs.vt.edu
Cliff Shaffer

Algorithm Visualizations

Faculty Advisor
Cliff Shaffer
Research Supervisor
Cliff Shaffer
Description of Work
Help to advance our research program on algorithm visualization and improving undergraduate education in Computer Science. Students will work with our OpenDSA project development team. Typically this involves creating one or more visualizations to be used in courses such as CS2114, CS3114, CS4104. We also develop infrastructure for our eTextbook system. Most development work is in HTML5/CSS/JavaScript. This project provides a good opportunity for learning or practicing web development skills. For information on the project, see http://algoviz.org/OpenDSA/ for examples of material, and http://opendsa.readthedocs.org for information about the development environment. We typically have several students each year working on the project for Independent Study or Undergraduate Research 4000-level credit.
Application Instructions
Contact Dr. Shaffer to set up an appointment.
Project URL
http://research.cs.vt.edu/AVresearch/vturcs
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
shaffer@vt.edu
Drs. Calvin Ribbens, Randall Wynne, Layne Watson

Algorithms and Software for Remote Sensing

Faculty Advisor
Drs. Calvin Ribbens, Randall Wynne, Layne Watson
Research Supervisor
Same
Description of Work
This is a joint research project between Computer Science and Forestry, sponsored by the Center for Environmental Applications of Remote Sensing (CEARS). There are several projects involving data structures, image processing, parallel computing, and high performance scientific computation. The work can be either for credit or pay. Two specific needs are: (1) good data structures and I/O tools for parallel processing and/or vectorization of HDF (4&5), HDF-EOS, and GeoTiff in Fortran 95. (2) Parallel implementations of "classic" clustering (ISODATA, agglomerative hierarchical clustering, etc.) and segmentation (e.g., watershed routines) algorithms in Fortran 95/MPI.
Application Instructions
Contact either of Drs. Ribbens or Watson.
Project URL
http://cears.fw.vt.edu
Area(s) of Research
Parallel Computation
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
ltw@cs.vt.edu
James D. Arthur

An Eclipse-based Prototype for Supporting Hazzard Analysis

Faculty Advisor
James D. Arthur
Research Supervisor
James D. Arthur
Description of Work
To develop a prototype tool (eclipse-based) that will support Hazard Analysis. Tool will provide interface to add Hazards, Causes and Mitigation approaches, and a rudimentary Graphical Editor for constructing/analyzing corresponding Functional Block Diagrams and Fault Trees
Application Instructions
Meet with Dr. Arthur
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
arthur@vt.edu
Dr. Joe Gabbard

AR Hololens Applications for Inspection Processes; Is More AR Always Better?

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Joe Gabbard
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
AR head-worn display interfaces, such as those provided via Microsoft Hololens, provide new opportunities to enhance existing critical tasks that currently rely on dated technologies and static (often paper) images. For this project, undergraduate students will assist ISE graduate students from the COGntive Engineering for Novel Technologies (COGENT) Lab (www.cogent.ise.vt.edu) in conducting human-factors studies that examine AR interface designs’ effects on human performance (e.g., visual inspection performance, situational awareness, primary task speed and accuracy). Aside from assisting in the human-factors studies, selected students will also create a poster describing their work to be presented at the ISE Undergraduate Research Symposium. In addition, the research conducted by students will be included in one or two conference or journal papers, in which the students have the opportunity to be co-authors. Credits: 2 - 3 credits Other Information: Requires a minimum of 6 - 9 hours per week (based on number of credits).Two students are required for this project.
Application Instructions
Students will be selected from among those who apply. Students should express interest and apply for this project by emailing a resume and short letter of intent to Dr. Joe Gabbard.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
jgabbard@vt.edu
Dr. Joe Gabbard

Augmented Reality -- Gamification of STEM Concepts Using Tablet-based AR

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Joe Gabbard
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
For this work, student(s) will design and develop a tablet-based augmented reality (AR) app with the goal of conveying important STEM concepts for early childhood education. Once built, the AR app will be fielded to K-12 student classrooms to examine the potential effectiveness of AR in learning. The AR app will be deployed in Android, likely using ARToolKit and Unity3D. Experience with Java, C/C++, Android NDK and OpenGL will be useful but not required, as ARToolKit is well-documented and supported. In general, research conducted by students may support user studies that are submitted for conference or journal publication. In these cases, students have the opportunity to be co-authors. Students will be selected from among those who apply. This work is for undergraduate research credit. As such, students are expected to spend on average 9 hours per week on the course (for a 3 credit hour enrollment), demonstrate initiative for self-paced learning and discovery, and complete assignments in a timely fashion and professional manner.
Application Instructions
Interested students who wish to apply for this project should email a resume and short paragraph of intent (in the email body) to Dr. Joe Gabbard >> jgabbard@vt.edu.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
Dr. Joe Gabbard

Augmented Reality -- Microsoft Hololens App for First-Responder User Interface Research

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Joe Gabbard
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
For this work, students will develop an app to serve as a testbed/framework for researching head-worn AR interfaces for first responders. The AR app will be deployed in Windows Holographic API and Unity3D. Experience with Visual Studio 2015, Windows 10 SDK & Universal Windows App Development Tools, Unity and OpenGL are strongly needed. In general, research conducted by students may support user studies that are submitted for conference or journal publication. In these cases, students have the opportunity to be co-authors. Students will be selected from among those who apply. This work is for undergraduate research credit. As such, students are expected to spend on average 9 hours per week on the course (for a 3 credit hour enrollment), demonstrate initiative for self-paced learning and discovery, and complete assignments in a timely fashion and professional manner.
Application Instructions
Interested students who wish to apply for this project should email a resume and short paragraph of intent (in the email body) to Dr. Joe Gabbard >> jgabbard@vt.edu.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
Dr. Joe Gabbard

Augmented Reality Human-Machine Interfaces for Automotive Head-up Displays

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Joe Gabbard
Research Supervisor
Kyle Tanous
Description of Work
AR head-up displays (AR HUD) interfaces provide a fundamentally new driving experience, but we currently do not know how to design safe and effective user interfaces in this space. For this project, undergraduate students will assist ISE graduate students from the COGntive Engineering for Novel Technologies (COGENT) Lab (www.cogent.ise.vt.edu) in conducting human-factors studies that examine AR interface designs’ effects on human performance (e.g., driving performance, visual scan patterns, response time). Aside from assisting in the human-factors studies, selected students will also create a poster describing their work to be presented at the ISE Undergraduate Research Symposium. In addition, the research conducted by students will be included in one or two conference or journal papers, in which the students have the opportunity to be co-authors. Credits: 2 - 3 credits Other Information: Requires a minimum of 6 - 9 hours per week (based on number of credits). Three students are required for this project
Application Instructions
Students will be selected from among those who apply. Students should express interest and apply for this project by emailing a resume and short letter of intent to Kyle Tanous.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
ktanous@vt.edu
Stephen Edwards

Automated Grading Meets Test-first Coding

Faculty Advisor
Stephen Edwards
Research Supervisor
Stephen Edwards
Description of Work
Web-CAT is an automated grading system used in some of our classes to grade students based on how they test their own code. We would like to support other schools who want to use Web-CAT for their courses too. Unfortunately, there are a number of institutional, policy-oriented, and technology-oriented problems that stand in the way of this. This project would involve plotting out a path towards a real open-source project that could be used by multiple schools, as well as towards accommodating the various administrative requirements of different institutions. This project would involve helping to architect a real-world web application designed for open-source development and educational use.
Application Instructions
Stop by during my office hours to discuss possibilities.
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering, Computer-Aided Instruction
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
edwards@cs.vt.edu
Stephen Edwards

Automatically Generating Test Data

Faculty Advisor
Stephen Edwards
Research Supervisor
Stephen Edwards
Description of Work
This project is a continuation of current research on techniques for automatically generating test data for software components. Think of a software component as a black-box that provides a well-defined "interface" as a series of methods. Generating one test case amounts to choosing a sequence of method calls (and their parameters) that will exercise the component in some interesting way. Automatically generating an entire test suite is then the problem of writing a program that can generate a reasonable number of "interesting" test cases in this fashion, and which will give some assurance that all the cases taken together will do a good job of revealing any defects hidden in the component's implementation. An early prototype generator that does this will be redesigned and re-engineered. Java programming experience is required, and the implementation of several graph-based algorithms is an important part of the project.
Application Instructions
Stop by my office hours to discuss possibilities.
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
edwards@cs.vt.edu
Benjamin Jantzen

Automating Scientific Discovery

Faculty Advisor
Benjamin Jantzen
Research Supervisor
Benjamin Jantzen
Description of Work
This work is focused on developing tools for automating inferences from data to reliable scientific theories. The biggest project currently underway, called EUGENE, aims to sort physical systems into kinds that are likely to support scientific laws and to use known kinds to construct novel variables for use in scientific investigation. There is plenty of room to work on the EUGENE algorithms directly, to develop some of the many potential applications of EUGENE, or to tackle a related problem of your own choice. You can find a bit more about EUGENE here: http://www.ratiocination.org/2015/10/07/the-eugene-project/
Application Instructions
Send an email to bjantzen@vt.edu to set up an appointment,
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Artificial Intelligence, Data Mining, Knowledge
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
bjantzen@vt.edu
Liqing Zhang

Bioinformatics in Genomics

Faculty Advisor
Liqing Zhang
Research Supervisor
Liqing Zhang
Description of Work
Ever wonder what do Bioformaticians do? Here is your opportunity to find out! The research question is: how genes with high sequence similarity diverge over time in both their function and expression? This is a fundamental question in biology, because most, if not all, genes in human and many other species' genomes are genes of this category. To answer this question, you need to know how to program in Perl and some knowledge on databases, both of which should be pretty easy to pick up. The benefit of doing this project is that not only will you get better at programming, but you will get to know some important questions in biology, especially to become aware what is going on in this exciting genomic era!
Application Instructions
Send e-mail.
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Data Mining
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
lqzhang@cs.vt.edu
Danesh Tafti

Building a Linux Cluster

Faculty Advisor
Danesh Tafti
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Update an existing linux cluster. Requires reconfiguration with OSCAR. The hardware is in place but needs to be reconfigured with updated software and OS. Great opportunity to get hands on experience in building clusters.
Application Instructions
Project URL
http://www.hpcfd.me.vt.edu
Area(s) of Research
Networking, Parallel Computation, Software Engineering, Systems
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
dtafti@vt.edu
Tanushree Mitra

Building social tools that augment current social computing systems

Faculty Advisor
Tanushree Mitra
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Range of projects that will allow you to work with social media data, and build tools/browser plugins/apps on social media systems, such as Facebook or Twitter.
Application Instructions
Please send me your resume listing your technical skills, past projects that you have worked on, your linked-in, github page links.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Artificial Intelligence, Data Mining, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Knowledge, Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
tmitra@vt.edu
Godmar Back

Client- and server-side web technology surrounding LibX

Faculty Advisor
Godmar Back
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Implement cool web technology with and surrounding LibX. For more information, see http://libx.org/ This project is for anybody who wants to learn modern, so-called "Web 2.0" technologies such as AJAX on both client or server. While our main application area is libraries (digital and traditional), the technology we develop transcends them. I have several projects "shovel-ready" and I am willing to entertain ideas (including for mobile applications) you may have. LibX-related projects have won multiple awards at past VTURCS symposia and have led to software that is used by tens of thousands of users world-wide.
Application Instructions
Send email.
Project URL
http://libx.org/
Area(s) of Research
Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Networking, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
gback@cs.vt.edu
Scott McCrickard

Collaborative Design on Large Displays

Faculty Advisor
Scott McCrickard
Research Supervisor
Scott McCrickard
Description of Work
This project explores issues related to the design of user interfaces through the creation of collaborative storyboards, diagrams, and other shared displays. The project team is investigating novel interfaces--large multitouch displays, tabletop computers, handhelds/tablets--that can facilitate the creative process.
Application Instructions
Contact the supervisors for details.
Project URL
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
mccricks@cs.vt.edu
Lenwood S. Heath

Computational Biology and Bioinformatics

Faculty Advisor
Lenwood S. Heath
Research Supervisor
Various
Description of Work
The Department of Computer Science has a number of faculty members involved in computational biology and bioinformatics (CBB) research. Such research often employs CS skills involving Perl programming, relational data bases, web service development, and mathematical or statistical analysis of biological data. The field of bioinformatics changes rapidly and offers many opportunities, so it is not possible to list all specific projects in VTURCS. Basically, if you know Perl, database, web development, algorithmic, or have other relevant skills, consider CBB.
Application Instructions
See Dr. Heath's web site for his current office hours. Stop by during office hours for a chat. He can direct you to faculty members who might be able to use your skills.
Project URL
http://people.cs.vt.edu/~heath/
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Theory, Computational Biology, Data Mining
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
heath@vt.edu
Scott McCrickard

Creating Real-World Peripheral Displays

Faculty Advisor
Scott McCrickard
Research Supervisor
Scott McCrickard
Description of Work
Peripheral devices like stock tickers and sports score trackers are moving off the computer desktop and into the real world. The goal of this projects is to build a real-word device that displays information collected online in an interesting way. Examples of existing systems and ideas for things to build are available from Dr. McCrickard, or come up with your own!
Application Instructions
Contact Dr. McCrickard for details and to sign up!
Project URL
none
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
mccricks@cs.vt.edu
John E. Taylor

CyberGRID (Cyber-enabled Global Research Infrastructure for Design)

Faculty Advisor
John E. Taylor
Research Supervisor
Josh Iorio
Description of Work
The globalization of the Architecture, Engineering, and Construction industry has distributed much of the design work across the globe. In an effort to reduce costs associated with co-locating design collaborators, our National Science Foundation-funded grant seeks to develop a virtual environment to support geographically-distributed engineers. For the past 3 years, our development teams have created and refined the CyberGRID, a virtual world where engineers can collaborate on the design of buildings. We are interesting in expanding our development team and are hiring programmers and 3D modelers to work on this project. Opportunity for multi-year employment is possible.
Application Instructions
We’re interested in hiring software engineers with the following experience: 1) solid understanding of Object-Oriented programming, preferably in Java, 2) experience navigating in virtual worlds, 3) some experience with C/C++ (especially the ability to work with pointers and str commands), and 4) some experience with PHP/MySQL. The CyberGRID has been developed in Unity (http://unity3d.com/), so successful candidates must be willing to work in this environment, although no experience in Unity is required. If interested in joining the CyberGRID development team, please contact Dr. Josh Iorio to schedule an interview.
Project URL
http://www.cend.cee.vt.edu/research/infosys.shtml
Area(s) of Research
Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
iorio@vt.edu
Chris North

Data visualization and analytics

Faculty Advisor
Chris North
Research Supervisor
Chris North
Description of Work
Learn to design and build tools for interactive big-data visualization and analytics, that enable humans to gain deep insight from big data.
Application Instructions
Email Dr. North (north@vt.edu) your GPA and transcript.
Project URL
http://infovis.cs.vt.edu/
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Computer-Aided Instruction, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering, Databases, Data Mining, Knowledge
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
north@vt.edu
Dr. Joe Gabbard

Decoupling Immersion and Presence in Virtual Reality

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Joe Gabbard
Research Supervisor
Rick Skarbez
Description of Work
Despite the fact that high quality virtual reality hardware is readily available and and visually compelling VR games and apps have flooded the market, we still do not fully understand the relationship between immersion (e.g., visually surrounded by images) and presence (e.g., the feeling of being there). For this project, undergraduate students will assist ISE postdoc and graduate students from the COGntive Engineering for Novel Technologies (COGENT) Lab (www.cogent.ise.vt.edu) in conducting human-factors studies that examine various aspects of Virtual Reality, and how those aspects effect both immersion and presence. Aside from assisting in the human-factors studies, selected students will also create a poster describing their work to be presented at the ISE Undergraduate Research Symposium. In addition, the research conducted by students will be included in one or two conference or journal papers, in which the students have the opportunity to be co-authors. Credits: 2 - 3 credits Other Information: Requires a minimum of 6 - 9 hours per week (based on number of credits). Three students are required for this project.
Application Instructions
Students will be selected from among those who apply. Students should express interest and apply for this project by emailing a resume and short letter of intent to Dr. Rick Skarbez
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
skarbez@vt.edu
Lenwood S. Heath

Deep, Personalized Searching

Faculty Advisor
Lenwood S. Heath
Research Supervisor
Lenwood S. Heath
Description of Work
Powerful keyword-based searching is available for the web (e.g., Google) and for scientific literature (e.g., Web of Science). However, a person searching for a very specific kind of resource may spend much effort on a search that ends in frustration due to a mismatch between keyword search and the semantics of her information resource needs.

The focus of this project is to incorporate semantic-based searching that is deep and time consuming, even leisurely. A search that takes 24 hours to find just the right resource(s) can be considered successful, as long as those 24 hours consist of automated effort only, while the person pursues other tasks and interests.

Keyword semantics will be obtained using word senses obtained through WordNet. A command-line user interface will launch semantic search algorithms that integrate keyword search (probably Google) and semantics. A relational database will be built to record search progress. Email notification of search milestones can be given. A prototype searcher will emphasize searching for a small list of high-quality tutorials on a precise topic specified by the user. Implementation will be under Linux or Mac OS X.

Application Instructions
If this description charges you up, then see Professor Heath during his office hours (available on his web site). Please bring a resume and transcript. A love of the subtleties of the English language is a definite plus.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Databases, Data Mining, Knowledge, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
heath@vt.edu
Doug Bowman

Demonstrating the benefits of immersion

Faculty Advisor
Doug Bowman
Research Supervisor
Doug Bowman
Description of Work
Immersive virtual environment technology (such as the CAVE) puts the user inside a 3D computer-generated world. Although this technology has been available for many years, we still know very little about the benefits of immersion. When should immersive technology be used, and what advantages should it provide? In this project, the student will implement a simple virtual world and design and run an experiment using the CAVE to demonstrate the benefits of immersion in this world. A wide range of experiments/worlds/tasks are possible.
Application Instructions
Send email to set up an appointment if you would like to apply. Experience with HCI (e.g. CS 3724) and computer graphics (e.g. CS 4204) is recommended, but not required. Experience with the design, administration, and/or statistical analysis of experiments is a plus.
Project URL
http://research.cs.vt.edu/3di/
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
bowman@vt.edu
Dr. Amine Chigani

Deploying SINERGY Infrastructure

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Amine Chigani
Research Supervisor
Dr. Amine Chigani
Description of Work
SINERGY (campuS sItuational awareNess and Emergency Response manaGement sYstem) is a proposed system-of-systems solution architecture that was developed to address the issue of balancing safety and openness on campus environments. It's based on the Service-Oriented Architecture and Web Services technologies. To enhance the comprehensiveness of SINERGY architecture, a detailed data and information models are needed. In addition, to begin to show the fitness of service orientation in this problem domain, a prototypical implementation of the SOA infrastructure is needed. This research has two distinct yet complementary projects suitable for an independent study or undergraduate research: 1. Conduct data collection through surveys and interviews of various SINERGY stakeholders. Use the insights gained from data analysis in enhancing SINERGY architecture. 2. Deploy WSO2 Enterprise Service Bus on a Virginia Tech local server and create prototypical services that provide SINERGY capabilities.
Application Instructions
Send me an e-mail and attach a copy of your resume. Schedule an initial meeting to agree on responsibilities and deliverables.
Project URL
http://manta.cs.vt.edu/sinergy/
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
achigani@vt.edu
Scott McCrickard

Designing and Evaluating Notification Systems

Faculty Advisor
Scott McCrickard
Research Supervisor
Scott McCrickard
Description of Work
Notification systems attempt to efficiently and effectively deliver current, important information to users in multitasking situations. Examples of notification systems include instant messengers, stock tickers, and ubiquitous systems. This independent study examines this emerging research area through team activities and semester projects in a fun but challenging environment.
Application Instructions
Email Dr. McCrickard for more details or to sign up.
Project URL
http://research.cs.vt.edu/ns/
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
mccricks@cs.vt.edu
W. Feng

Desktop Supercomputing with the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

Faculty Advisor
W. Feng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Today's high-definition displays, e.g., 1080p = 1920x1080 > 2 million pixels, support a frame rate of 30 frames per second (fps) so that fast-actioned video appears smooth to the viewer. In other words, 60-million pixels must be updated every second. Such processing capability amounts to needing a supercomputing device (in this case, a video card) to update the display at such a fast rate. Consequently, this project seeks to 'hijack' and re-purpose the use of the video card, or more specifically, the graphics processing unit (GPU) within the video card, for general-purpose computing. Target GPUs include the following: AMD Radeon HD 5450, AMD Radeon HD 5870, AMD Radeon HD 5970, AMD Firepro V7700, NVIDIA GTX 280, NVIDIA GTX 480, NVIDIA GTX 580, NVIDIA Tesla Fermi, and the much-ballyhooed AMD Fusion. To actually see the power of the GPU in action, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPBFenYg2Zk. There are a myriad of component projects associated with this project. A sampling is provided below: 1. GPU and the 13 Dwarfs. http://www.gpucomputing.net/?q=node/275. 2. "Compute the Cure" for Cancer using GPUs. Google 'Feng Compute the Cure' for more information. 3. Molecular dynamics in support of rational drug design. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPBFenYg2Zk. Note: For those interested in human-computer interaction, a nice interface to the above would serve as a nice project as well, or an interface to our existing codes.
Application Instructions
E-mail a resume to feng@cs.vt.edu. Optional, but preferred, materials include unofficial undergraduate transcript and a brief one-paragraph statement of what interests you about this project.
Project URL
http://synergy.cs.vt.edu/ and http://accel.cs.vt.edu/
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Human-Computer Interaction, Parallel Computation, Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering, Systems, Theory, Databases, Data Mining, Knowledge
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
feng@cs.vt.edu
Liqing Zhang

Develop computational tools and web server for the prediction of SNP function in the cow genome

Faculty Advisor
Liqing Zhang
Research Supervisor
Liqing Zhang and Honglin Jiang
Description of Work
In this project, we will develop a SNP (Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms) function prediction tool that is badly needed in the study of agriculturally and economically important animals. SNPs are variations in single positions harbored in the genomes of a species population and hold the key to our understanding of human and other animal genetic diseases and disease susceptibility and thus effective treatment. SNPs in the cow genome also affect meat and milk quality and quantity. The cow genome has ~2.2 million SNPs whose functions are largely unknown. Fishing out functionally important SNPs from the millions amounts to looking for needle in the hay for biologists. Here, we will develop a computational pipeline for SNP function prediction and create a web server that hosts function prediction results and services. This tool will be the first designed specifically for studying SNPs in agricultural animals. The prediction results will provide biologists a focal point for identifying functionally important SNPs.
Application Instructions
Email.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Software Engineering, Computational Biology, Databases, Data Mining
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
lqzhang@vt.edu
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones

Digital Government

Faculty Advisor
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones
Research Supervisor
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones
Description of Work
Assist with requirments analysis, software design and field testing, or with data analysis from ongoing interviews, surveys and community focus groups. We study the use and impact of information technology on citizen-to-citizen interaction and deliberation. Are online resources increasing civic engagement? For whom -- an elite or a more broad spectrum of citizens? Do we need better tools (or modifications to existing tools) to support deliberative democracy and to integrate online feedback from citizens to government? Which social media are effective for what types of interaction for which users?
Application Instructions
Contact Andrea Kavanaugh by email (kavan@vt.edu), or phone (231-1806). My office is 1137 KnowledgeWorks II (CS Department at the corporate research center).
Project URL
http://diggov.cs.vt.edu
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction, Theory
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
kavan@vt.edu
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones, Deborah Tatar

Do Cell Phones Teach Computing Skills?

Faculty Advisor
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones, Deborah Tatar
Research Supervisor
Andrea Kavanaugh, Manuel Perez-Quinones, Deborah Tatar
Description of Work
This project, entitled Scaffolding Technology for Low Literacy Groups: From Cells Phones to Desktop Computing, seeks to understand the role that cell phone usage might play in helping adults with low reading and computer literacy to learn computing skills. We are also designing and developing tools to provide an interface between cell phone applications (e.g., contact list, text messaging) and comparable programs on desktop computers (e.g., email, word processing).
Application Instructions
Contact Dr. Andrea Kavanaugh by email.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Human-Computer Interaction, Theory
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
kavan@vt.edu
Na Meng

Empirical Study on Library API Migration Changes

Faculty Advisor
Na Meng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
We will mine version control history of open source projects at Github to see how developers make adjustment changes to their code when migrating from one version of the software library to another version
Application Instructions
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Data Mining, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
nm8247@cs.vt.edu
Na Meng

Empirical study on security bugs

Faculty Advisor
Na Meng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Mining software repository of open source projects at Github (https://github.com) to understand existing security bugs and how developers fix them.
Application Instructions
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Data Mining, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
nm8247@cs.vt.edu
Edward A. Fox

Ensemble Pathway to Computing Education Resources

Faculty Advisor
Edward A. Fox
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Virginia Tech is a key part of the NSF-funded Ensemble project, in charge of its distributed portal, to support those who want to make learning about computing easier and better. Our aim is to improve access to educational materials related to computing. At VT we work with Drupal, Fedora Repository, Facebook, and other innovative systems. We need people to work on interfaces, machine learning, classification, ontologies, social networks, personalization, and many other challenges.
Application Instructions
Please contact Dr. Fox for more details. Also involved are Drs. Shaffer and Edwards and Fan.
Project URL
http://www.computingportal.org
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Parallel Computation, Databases, Knowledge, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
fox@vt.edu
Andrea Kavanaugh

EPIC

Faculty Advisor
Andrea Kavanaugh
Research Supervisor
Andrea Kavanaugh
Description of Work
The EPIC project is an investigation by the Center for Human-Computer Interaction of the use and impact of community computer networking in Blacksburg and Montgomery County supported by NSF. Undergraduate research assistants could help this summer with interview data analysis (using NVIVO software), survey data processing (using SPSS), and/or session logging analysis. If you are interested, please contact Andrea Kavanaugh (kavan@vt.edu or 231-1806)
Application Instructions
Contact Andrea Kavanaugh (kavan@vt.edu or 231-1806)
Project URL
http://epic.cs.vt.edu
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction, Networking
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
kavan@vt.edu
Boris A Vinatzer

Evolutionary mechanisms in bacterial diseases

Faculty Advisor
Boris A Vinatzer
Research Supervisor
Boris A Vinatzer
Description of Work
Apply bioinformatics to extract information on evolution of bacterial pathogens from public databases and to design experiments on bacterial plant pathogens isolated form the field. Data obtained in the lab will be analyzed using various bioinformatic tools to gain insieght into the evlution of bacterial plant pathogens. The long term goal is to understand how new genes evolve in bacteria. Your work will consist in using existing bioinformtaic tools to search databases, to compare DNA sequences, to design DNA "primers" for polymerase chain reaction, to analyze data produced in the lab, and possibly to develop scripts to grap outputs from one programm to use as input in other programs.
Application Instructions
Send e-mail to Boris Vinatzer at vinatzer@vt.edu
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
vinatzer@vt.edu
Na Meng

Flaky Test Diagnosis

Faculty Advisor
Na Meng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Design and implement an approach to help developers debug flaky tests--tests whose behaviors are nondeterministic.
Application Instructions
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Problem Solving Environments, Software Engineering, Systems
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
nm8247@cs.vt.edu
Wu Feng

High-Performance Biological Sequence Search

Faculty Advisor
Wu Feng
Research Supervisor
Heshan Lin
Description of Work
Biological sequence searching has become a fundamental aspect of all bioinformatics. It can help in tasks such as sequencing the human genome, designing pathogen signatures for pathogen detection, identifying unknown viruses (e.g., the virus now known as SARS), and so on. In this project, you will be coding different modules of part of a much larger project (i.e., mpiBLAST at http://www.mpiblast.org) in order to improve functionality, maintainability, and performance.
Application Instructions
E-mail a resume to feng@cs.vt.edu. Optional, but preferred, materials include unofficial undergraduate transcript and a brief one-paragraph statement of what interests you about this project.
Project URL
http://www.mpiblast.org/
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Parallel Computation, Software Engineering, Systems, Theory, Computational Biology, Databases, Data Mining, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
feng@cs.vt.edu
Lenwood S. Heath

Human Memory Mirror

Faculty Advisor
Lenwood S. Heath
Research Supervisor
Lenwood S. Heath
Description of Work
Human memory enjoys a very different structure and different capabilities from artificial memories such as RAM, file systems, and the Internet. For example, file systems were designed primarily for space efficiency and access speed and only secondarily for appropriateness for use by humans. In particular, directories, files, and hierarchies are far less powerful representations of knowledge than human memory.

The aim of this project is to design a radically new kind of "file system" (actually a human memory mirror) in analogy to human memory. A prototype that runs under Linux should be implemented as a proof of concept.

Application Instructions
If this description appeals to you, see Professor Heath during his office hours for a chat. Research may be done by a team or individually. Bring a resume and transcript.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Systems, Knowledge, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
heath@vt.edu
Edward A. Fox

IDEAL (Integrated Digital Event Archive and Library)

Faculty Advisor
Edward A. Fox
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
NSF is supporting our collecting tweets (over 1 billion) and webpages (over 12 terabytes) about important world events. We are concerned about sustainability, population growth, climate change, and other global issues. We aim to aid the public, digital humanists, and those helping with violence, crises, tragedies, and recovery. We also collect about community and government events. We run a 20 node Hadoop cluster to support machine learning, natural language processing, geolocation, indexing, tagging, analysis, visualization, searching, and browsing. With the Internet Archive, we develop better methods for Web archiving. One aim is to aid those who face natural or man-made crises or tragedies, so communities can recover effectively.
Application Instructions
Contact Dr. Fox (fox@vt.edu) or Dr. Kavanaugh
Project URL
http://www.eventsarchive.org
Area(s) of Research
Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Parallel Computation, Databases, Data Mining, Knowledge, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
fox@vt.edu
Deborah Tatar

MicroCoordination Study and Development for Data Analysis

Faculty Advisor
Deborah Tatar
Research Supervisor
Joon Suk Lee
Description of Work
We have a number of multi-person collaborative Sudoku games that differ in the kinds of collaboration they afford to users. We are currently seeking a research assistant for our “Micro-coordination” project. A student (research assistant) will have a chance to participate in an administrative process in an on-going HCI research project as well as in a data analysis tool development process. Administrative part will involve running experiments with subjects, preparing materials for running experiments, and preparing data for analysis. For data analysis tool development part, s/he will be asked to develop a set of data analysis tools. S/he can choose any programming language (preferably Java and/or Python) but minimum knowledge on file I/O handling, and GUI programming is required. The research assistant will keep written record of their hours and accomplishments and attend research meetings(once a week), prepared to talk about their experiences and accomplishments. The student will evaluated by (1) his or her accomplishment of the assigned task and/or (2) his/her negotiation about how to handle obstacles and (3) the quality of his/her communication about progress and obstacles.
Application Instructions
Please send email to dolomite@cs.vt.edu and cc dtatar@cs.vt.edu.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
dolomite@vt.edu; dtatar@cs.vt.edu
Nicholas F. Polys

Mobile 3D Graphics

Faculty Advisor
Nicholas F. Polys
Research Supervisor
Nicholas F. Polys
Description of Work
This project will devise 3D and web-based applications and interfaces especially for mobile devices. How do we use the extra speed and dimensionality to improve work, play, and usability? We will look at remote maintenance scenarios and augmented reality.
Application Instructions
Email to setup a convenient time to discuss details.
Project URL
not online yet
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
npolys@vt.edu
Scott McCrickard

Mobile Interfaces for Healthy Living

Faculty Advisor
Scott McCrickard
Research Supervisor
Scott McCrickard
Description of Work
Mobile interfaces--including those on handhelds, tablets, and smartwatches--provide opportunities for users to track and assess their physical and mental well-being. This project provides opportunities to investigate interfaces for a variety of groups, including college students, children, older adults, and people with special needs. Projects will involve developing applications for state-of-the-art handheld computers, and conducting usability tests on them. Come with your own domain ideas, or plug into one of the many ideas from around campus!
Application Instructions
Email Dr. McCrickard to apply.
Project URL
http://research.cs.vt.edu/ns/
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
mccricks@cs.vt.edu
Anil Vullikanti

Modeling and analysis of social networks

Faculty Advisor
Anil Vullikanti
Research Supervisor
Samarth Swarup
Description of Work
We have a summer project available on modeling the structure of social (friendship) networks. Friendship networks are highly asymmetric, therefore the goal of this project is to extend an existing model for decomposing the hierarchical clustering structure of social networks to deal with directed networks. It requires strong knowledge of C++ programming and a basic understanding of graphs, but no prior experience working with social networks. This work will lead to a research publication. Areas of research Social networks, machine learning, data mining
Application Instructions
Contact Samarth Swarup at swarup@vbi.vt.edu
Project URL
Area(s) of Research
Artificial Intelligence, Data Mining, Theory
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
vsakumar@vt.edu
Yang Cao, Layne Watson

Modeling and Simulation of Biochemical Systems (Cell Cycle Model and Insulin Oscillation Model)

Faculty Advisor
Yang Cao, Layne Watson
Research Supervisor
Yang Cao
Description of Work
We have two REU research projects. They focus on research training in the multidisciplinary area that combines mathematics, computer science and biology. Due to the interdisciplinary feature, students are not expected to have pre-knowledge of many topics. But an open mind and curiosity in mathematics and science will be very helpful. We will provide necessary training and guidance for students to learn basic theories and techniques and to gain research experience at the frontier line in scientific computing and computational biology areas. Usually a graduate student will work closely with an REU student. Office space and a computer will also be provided in Torgersen 2160 area. Based on your contribution to the project, you will be encouraged to co-author scientific research papers. Currently two NSF funded projects are available for REU training. One is related to the cell cycle model and the other is related to the insulin oscillation model. For detailed information about the two projects, please check http://people.cs.vt.edu/~ycao/ Please note that the topics in the REU projects will be adjusted according to a REU student's background. A typical starting project will be to run different simulation codes, to collect simulation data, and to join the discussion to analyze the simulation data. As you gain more research experience, you will be asked to design your own algorithm and experiment, write your own code and present your results in the group meeting.
Application Instructions
Interested Students should send email to Dr. Cao (ycao@cs.vt.edu).
Project URL
http://people.cs.vt.edu/~ycao/reu.html
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
ycao@cs.vt.edu
Chris North

Novel interactions with large or tabletop displays

Faculty Advisor
Chris North
Research Supervisor
Chris North
Description of Work
Create novel interaction techniques for non-traditional display systems, such as the large high-resolution GigaPixel Display and multi-touch tabletop displays.
Application Instructions
Email Dr. North (north@vt.edu) your GPA and transcript.
Project URL
http://infovis.cs.vt.edu/
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction, Problem Solving Environments
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
north@vt.edu
Wu Feng

Parallel Programming with Video Cards and More ...

Faculty Advisor
Wu Feng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
The world of computing is now irrevocably parallel. CPUs have "topped" out roughly 3.0 GHz. So, while performance in the past has doubled roughly every 2 years due to increases in clock frequency, future performance increases will be due to the doubling of the number of cores in a system every 2 years. As such, we are looking at programming models, environments, and applications on multicore and manycore architectures. Of particular relevance and accessibility for VTURCS students are mapping applications onto traditional multicore (Intel and AMD), hybrid multicore (Cell and PlayStation3), manycore (video cards), and reconfigurable multicore (Tilera TILE64) architectures.
Application Instructions
E-mail a resume to feng@cs.vt.edu. Optional, but preferred, materials include unofficial undergraduate transcript and a brief one-paragraph statement of what interests you about this project.
Project URL
http://synergy.cs.vt.edu/
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Human-Computer Interaction, Parallel Computation, Systems, Theory, Computational Biology, Data Mining
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
feng@cs.vt.edu
Godmar Back

Programming Language Reference Project

Faculty Advisor
Godmar Back
Research Supervisor
Godmar Back
Description of Work
Create a web resource that provides a quick reference for different programming languages, based on how common programming idioms are expressed in them. The idea is to compare by saying: "If you write this in C, you'd use this in Perl". Using this resource should make it easy to learn a new programming language by referring to a language one already knows. A key criteria should be conciseness, but pointers to further information should be provided as well. See the project web page for a further description.
Application Instructions
Send email to gback@cs.vt.edu if you're interested.
Project URL
http://people.cs.vt.edu/~gback/PLCP/PLCP.html
Area(s) of Research
Software Engineering, Systems
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
gback@cs.vt.edu
Alexey Onufriev

Protein folding on a PC.

Faculty Advisor
Alexey Onufriev
Research Supervisor
Alexey Onufriev and grad. students
Description of Work
Have you heard of the famous "protein folding" problem? What people call the "grand challenge of computational science"? We are working on an algorithm that has the potential to solve the problem on a --single PC--. If you want to be a part of the team and have a chance to publish in prestigious journals, join us. No prior knowledge of biology or physics is required, only enthusiasm for solving hard problems. However, excellent programming skills and solid math background are a must.
Application Instructions
email me.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Software Engineering, Theory, Computational Biology
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
alexey@cs.vt.edu
Layne T. Watson

Research in Mathematical Software

Faculty Advisor
Layne T. Watson
Research Supervisor
Layne T. Watson
Description of Work
My work is at the interface of computer science, mathematics, and engineering. The overall goal is to provide sophisticated mathematical software, justified by rigorous mathematical analysis, to attack significant practical engineering and scientific problems. Visit my research projects page for details on a number of my active projects.
Application Instructions
Send me an email.
Project URL
http://www.cs.vt.edu/~ltw/res_projs.html
Area(s) of Research
Theory, Problem Solving Environments, Parallel Computation
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
ltw@cs.vt.edu
Liqing Zhang

Revealing the mystery of the evolution of overlapping genes

Faculty Advisor
Liqing Zhang
Research Supervisor
Liqing Zhang
Description of Work
Increasing studies have shown that overlapping genes are an important phenomenon in many eukaryotic genomes such as human, mouse, flies, and plants. These genes play an important role in regulation of gene expression at the levels of transcription, mRNA processing, splicing, or translation. However, functional studies of these genes are still in its infancy. Little is known about the exact functional role of these genes and their evolutionary dynamics in the genome. In this project, we will perform a large scale analysis of these genes in several animal and plant genomes and analyse the birth and death of these genes using bioinformatics approaches.
Application Instructions
Send an email to me.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
lqzhang@v.tedu
Andrea Kavanaugh

Social Computing

Faculty Advisor
Andrea Kavanaugh
Research Supervisor
Andrea Kavanaugh
Description of Work
Working with local groups in the community to help them become information producers through the use of tools for non-experts (for example, authoring web materials, customizing content, and collaborating online with wikis or blogs). Various local groups include medical (New River Health District), educational (Montgomery schools), ethnic (Christiansburg Institute), civic (Literacy Volunteers), and socio-economically disadvantaged (New River Community Action, Appalachian Women's Alliance).
Application Instructions
Contact me by email (kavan@vt.edu) or telephone (231-1806); my office is 1116 in KnowledgeWorks II, the CS Department building in the corporate research center.
Project URL
http://www.cs.vt.edu/node/682
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction, Theory
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
kavan@vt.edu
Kurt Luther

Social Computing / Crowdsourcing Research Projects

Faculty Advisor
Kurt Luther
Research Supervisor
Kurt Luther
Description of Work
Dr. Kurt Luther (Computer Science) is seeking talented and enthusiastic undergraduates to work on a variety of research projects related to social computing, crowdsourcing, creativity, and/or digital humanities. There are multiple opportunities to work for either course credit or hourly wages, starting ASAP. We are particularly interested in students with the following skill sets: web development, graphic design, interviewing, and data analysis. For more information and to learn about some of our projects, please visit Dr. Luther’s website: http://www.kurtluther.com/
Application Instructions
If you are interested in a position, please email Dr. Luther (kluther@vt.edu) with your resume and a brief description of the project(s) that interest you and any relevant skills/experiences.
Project URL
http://www.kurtluther.com/
Area(s) of Research
Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Databases, Knowledge
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
kluther@vt.edu
Madhav Marathe

Software Development for Large Complex Simulations

Faculty Advisor
Madhav Marathe
Research Supervisor
Madhav Marathe and Keith Bisset
Description of Work
The Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Laboratory (NDSSL) is actively pursuing a program to build very large scale simulations of biological, information, technical and social (BITS) systems. Examples include: transportation systems, integrated next generation telecommunication systems, epidemiology and public health, commodity markets and systems biology. Participate in the design and implementation of BIST systems. Work in a multi-disciplinary team on a range of topics, including development and testing of algorithms, web services definitions and implementations, large scale software development.
Application Instructions
Please send an email with your resume. Experience in C++ and Java is required and familiarity with Web services, algorithm design and development and high performance computing is a plus.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Parallel Computation, Software Engineering, Theory
Compensation
Work for Pay or Credit
Contact
marathe@vt.edu or kbisset@vbi.vt.edu
Onufriev

SuperComputer on a Desk

Faculty Advisor
Onufriev
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
An emerging platform for parallel computation in many sciences is GPU (graphics cards). A desktop computer equipped with just 8 of those cards can now beat one of the world's best supercomputer for certain scientific tasks such as protein folding. See for example this interview from NVIDIA's CEO http://ambermd.org/gpus/ Become part of our collaborative team (profs. Onufriev and Feng) that investigates this new frontier in computational science.
Application Instructions
Email Alexey Onufriev alexey@cs.vt.edu
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Computational Biology, Parallel Computation, Systems
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
alexey@cs.vt.edu
Dan Dunlap

TeacherBridge

Faculty Advisor
Dan Dunlap
Research Supervisor
Dan Dunlap
Description of Work
The Center for Human-Computer Interaction is seeking applicants for 2 NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) positions with the TeacherBridge Project (http://www.teacherbridge.org). Ideal applicants would be highly motivated undergraduate students in Computer Science, Engineering, or related fields who are interested in research with technology and local K-12 teachers. The positions will involve approximately 10 hours per week at $11 per hour for Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 semesters. The tasks will involve research and evaluation related to the TeacherBridge project, system, and participants. This includes a wide range of possibilities such as data collection, analysis, field research, and related tool development. Please contact Dan Dunlap 231-2345 for more information.
Application Instructions
Contact me.
Project URL
http://www.teacherbridge.org
Area(s) of Research
Human-Computer Interaction
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
dunlapd@vt.edu
Dr. Christopher Williams; Dr. Chris North

The Adaptive Concept Map (large-scale node-Link diagram visualization)

Faculty Advisor
Dr. Christopher Williams; Dr. Chris North
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
The goal of this project is create a new type of “digital textbook” for an engineering course. While the content would be standard, the innovation lies in the visualization of the structure of the information. The online tool we aim to create, termed “the adaptive concept map” is a navigable node-link diagram (concept map) of the course topics that provide the user the ability to “zoom-in and zoom-out” of varying levels of topic detail. Expert generated concept maps (node-link diagrams designed to visualize an expert’s cognitive structures) have been shown to improve learning and retention when used with classroom instruction or as a way to organize digital information. As with any node link diagram, however, when maps become too large they become very difficult to process. Existing strategies to combat this problem include animating the creation of the map or creating a nested map structure. While both of these strategies have been shown to reduce cognitive overload, neither of them are optimal solutions for all learners and both hinder navigation of the information in some way. At its core, the proposed adaptive concept map is a series of linked content pages. These pages would be mostly traditional webpages that provide information on a specific idea from a course (about 20 minutes of classroom instruction). In addition to the content itself, the pages would include tags indicating the related ideas, tags indicating the nature of those relationships, and tags indicating any groups the individual idea belongs to (such as chapter or course groups). Once the content pages are created, the adaptive map software would be used to navigate these pages. Users would be able to view the information at different levels of abstraction. At the lowest level of abstraction (highest detail) the user would view an individual idea in the form of the content page created by a content expert. If the user “zooms out” they begin to see the concept map structure. The content page that is the current focus of the user gets reduced to a node with a short description. Using the metadata embedded in the pages, the adaptive map tool would build up other related concepts around the central node. As the user continues to zoom out more and more layers of related nodes build upon the focus node. As more nodes become displayed, less information is displayed for each node. First descriptions and then the titles themselves disappear. As this happens, clouds form over groups of nodes showing the groups the nodes belong to. Chapter titles and then course titles become visible over groups of nodes. At any level of abstraction except for the lowest level, the user will also be able to navigate the structure by clicking on other nodes in the display. The adaptive concept map tool is hypothesized to help visualize and navigate large concept maps. Large concept maps could be used to structure information for an entire course and link together several courses over a curriculum.
Application Instructions
Please send a resume and statement of interest to Dr. Williams (cbwilliams@vt.edu) and Dr. North (north@cs.vt.edu).
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Databases, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Knowledge, Software Engineering
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
cbwilliams@vt.edu
T. M. Murali

The Social Network of Genes and Proteins

Faculty Advisor
T. M. Murali
Research Supervisor
T. M. Murali
Description of Work
Genes, proteins, and other molecules within the cell interact with each other in complex networks. They can bind to each other, form groups, break up, and control one another. Disruptions in these interactions can be the cause of major diseases such as cancers. My research grop uses techniques from graph theory, machine learning, and data mining to understand the structure and function of these networks. Projects can involve the design of new algorithms, implementation of current algorithms, and the development of web servers. Examples include http://graphspace.org https://github.com/tmmurali/PathLinker/ https://github.com/tmmurali/halp
Application Instructions
Please send me email with your resume, preferably in PDF format, and an unofficial copy of your transcript.
Project URL
http://bioinformatics.cs.vt.edu/~murali
Area(s) of Research
Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Data Mining
Compensation
Work for Credit
Contact
murali@cs.vt.edu
W. Feng

The Sockets Benchmark Suite

Faculty Advisor
W. Feng
Research Supervisor
T. Scogland
Description of Work
Create a sockets benchmark suite that provides a number of tests, either with TCP, UDP, or SCTP: 1. Two-process performance: Latency, Bandwidth, Bidirectional bandwidth, Connection time. 2. Multi-process performance: Hot-spot, fan-in, fan-out. 3. External CPU usage measurement utility (by reading samples from the proc file system). 4. Rate-controlled bandwidth and packet loss measurements (UDP only).
Application Instructions
E-mail a resume to feng@cs.vt.edu. Optional, but preferred, materials include unofficial undergraduate transcript and a brief one-paragraph statement of what interests you about this project.
Project URL
http://
Area(s) of Research
Networking, Systems
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
feng@cs.vt.edu
Prof. D. Tafti

Toolset for Dynamic Optimization of High-End Hybrid Applications

Faculty Advisor
Prof. D. Tafti
Research Supervisor
Prof. D. Tafti
Description of Work
Involves working with a nationwide team of developers of state-of-the-art compilers and performance tools for OpenMP parallel applications. Tasks will involve applying compilers and performance tools for optimization of high-end applications and aiding developers in fine-tuning tools.
Application Instructions
email with resume.
Project URL
http://www2.cs.uh.edu/~copper/index.html
Area(s) of Research
Parallel Computation
Compensation
Work for Pay
Contact
dtafti@vt.edu
Edward A. Fox

Undergraduate Researcher in Digital Libraries

Faculty Advisor
Edward A. Fox
Research Supervisor
Edward A. Fox
Description of Work
Many projects related to digital libraries, from theory to software to systems to performance to applications (especially to education). The URL below lists many research ideas. See also Digital Library Research Laboratory www.dlib.vt.edu or Faculty Advisor's home page http://fox.cs.vt.edu for more info.
Application Instructions
Contact E. Fox, x5113, 2160G Torgersen Hall
Project URL
http://fox.cs.vt.edu/talks/Research.htm
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Digital Libraries, Human-Computer Interaction, Software Engineering, Theory, Databases, Data Mining, Knowledge, Artificial Intelligence
Compensation
Work for Credit or Volunteer
Contact
fox@vt.edu
Wu Feng

Virtual Computing for K-12 Pedagogy

Faculty Advisor
Wu Feng
Research Supervisor
Description of Work
Computing has become an indispensable tool for enhancing productivity, accelerating scientific discovery and innovation, and enriching K-12 education. However, with respect to the latter, computing has arguably had limited impact on children, parents, and teachers in rural and economically disadvantaged areas and serves as additional evidence of the ever-expanding digital divide between the “haves” and “have nots.” To address this inequity as well as reduce the overall cost of adopting and maintaining information technology (IT) infrastructures in K-12 education, we propose to build upon our virtualization project: • To simplify and expedite the delivery of educational content anywhere and anytime. • To create an engaging and “kid-friendly” curriculum so as to improve the quality of IT education holistically from elementary school through high school and in support of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).
Application Instructions
E-mail a resume to feng@cs.vt.edu. Optional, but preferred, materials include unofficial undergraduate transcript and a brief one-paragraph statement of what interests you about this project.
Project URL
http://myvice.cs.vt.edu/
Area(s) of Research
Computer-Aided Instruction, Human-Computer Interaction, Systems
Compensation
Negotiable
Contact
feng@cs.vt.edu